What's your number?

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eightbo
Posts: 1943
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 8:19 pm
Location: Malta

gazuty wrote:
Sun Dec 02, 2018 6:47 am
...If I step outside of work and am no longer Mr X from Y, who will I be?
This is beautiful. Definitely something which should be explored in your own time.

Infinite capital will free up your time and provide opportunity but it's an illusion to think lasting satisfaction will arise when you hit x-amount.
This is the mistake of too many westerners who accumulate their nest egg and then wonder what it's all for.

I suggest you spend your resources pursuing fulfillment by giving deep contemplation to what's important to you. Consider how you can pursue or contribute to such things in a way you'll be truly proud of.

If you died next week, would you be happy with how you've spent your finite time here on this planet? Because that will be it. No do-overs.
If unsure or you arrive at a no, entertain the idea of how you might course-correct moving forward.

What you certainly don't want is to arrive at your death bed with a lengthy list of regrets.
I don't care what you have to lose, it's not too late to take a risk or two if it the upside is a chance at true freedom — peace of mind.

Best of luck, sincerely.
arbitrage16
Posts: 256
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2017 7:27 pm

eightbo wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:23 pm
gazuty wrote:
Sun Dec 02, 2018 6:47 am
...If I step outside of work and am no longer Mr X from Y, who will I be?
This is beautiful. Definitely something which should be explored in your own time.

Infinite capital will free up your time and provide opportunity but it's an illusion to think lasting satisfaction will arise when you hit x-amount.
This is the mistake of too many westerners who accumulate their nest egg and then wonder what it's all for.

I suggest you spend your resources pursuing fulfillment by giving deep contemplation to what's important to you. Consider how you can pursue or contribute to such things in a way you'll be truly proud of.

If you died next week, would you be happy with how you've spent your finite time here on this planet? Because that will be it. No do-overs.
If unsure or you arrive at a no, entertain the idea of how you might course-correct moving forward.

What you certainly don't want is to arrive at your death bed with a lengthy list of regrets.
I don't care what you have to lose, it's not too late to take a risk or two if it the upside is a chance at true freedom — peace of mind.

Best of luck, sincerely.
Your posts of late have taken on a quality that leads me to believe you've recently dabbled in LSD or DMT.
eightbo
Posts: 1943
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 8:19 pm
Location: Malta

Just a guy looking to help others.
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gazuty
Posts: 1917
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 11:03 am

gazuty wrote:
Sun Dec 02, 2018 6:47 am
And then, when I have set this number in my mind in the past - it has been a very different thing. I started at AUD$2,000,000 on the philosophy of earning a 5% inflation adjusted return and living on AUD$100,000 per year. That was when I was young. The GFC blew that dream away, in that the yield to be achieved is way too high. I've changed that to 2% inflation adjusted. And I've revised my annual living needs to AUD$200,000. So I guess my number is now AUID$10,000,000. Again, please don't get me wrong, I'm not saying I am capable of reaching this number in assets outside my house. I'm just trying to work out when I would feel "free".
Damn - Coronavirus changes my thoughts on this again.
Mcdonkey
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2020 2:00 pm

I remember when I first got into investing in stocks and calculating when I could tell my boss to f-off, that was about 6 years ago, and today I'm must older, balder and wiser? Still young, 35 y.o but my goal has changed dramatically , before my number would have been around 2million dollar, today with the low monthly expenditure that I have, I'd say my number is less than 800k.
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Crazyskier
Posts: 620
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2016 6:36 pm

eightbo wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:23 pm
gazuty wrote:
Sun Dec 02, 2018 6:47 am
...If I step outside of work and am no longer Mr X from Y, who will I be?


What you certainly don't want is to arrive at your death bed with a lengthy list of regrets.
I don't care what you have to lose, it's not too late to take a risk or two if it the upside is a chance at true freedom — peace of mind.

Best of luck, sincerely.
Actually I remember exploring something like this when I was doing psychology at Uni. We looked at how a typical 80-year life could be segmented into LEARNING (0-21) / EARNING (21-60) and YEARNING (60+) for all the things you DIDN'T do.

The saying, ''It's better to regret the things you did do'' has stuck with me. I also like, ''Asking forgiveness is sometimes better than asking permission.''

CS
eightbo
Posts: 1943
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 8:19 pm
Location: Malta

Crazyskier wrote:
Sun Dec 20, 2020 10:25 am

The saying, ''It's better to regret the things you did do'' has stuck with me. I also like, ''Asking forgiveness is sometimes better than asking permission.''

CS
Top quote CS, n1
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