Anyone read any good books?

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eightbo
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jamesg46 wrote:
Fri Sep 20, 2019 6:47 pm
Living the wisdom of the toa (auto correct wanted to put toast :lol: )

Great listen and a huge eye opener for me personally, I've noticed so many horrible characteristics in my own personality, which seem to be natural in western society. I certainly couldn't see myself practicing Toaism but it gives some great insights into human behaviour from two very different cultures.
Thanks for sharing this. Managed to find the audiobook in full on YT and look forward to getting through it. (this one definitely goes in the "b4 bed" pile)

I think if you were to take up taoist philosophy you'd adopt the position that personalities cannot be "horrible"; instead they simply just are. Knowing they're a result of how things played out in the universe and accepting that. Sort of like if we rolled a dice twice we recognise the 6 is no different to the 1. The bitter old man is no different from the Saint. The universe is constantly in motion and as such accepting circumstances for what they are doesn't mean we're saying things will never change. They're changing all the time and if you want to work on certain parts of your personality I say more power to you. Once we understand the true nature of how things came to be, there's really no room for affliction to circumstance. Certainly not long-term anyway.
jamesg46
Posts: 2418
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 1:05 pm

eightbo wrote:
Fri Sep 20, 2019 8:00 pm
jamesg46 wrote:
Fri Sep 20, 2019 6:47 pm
Living the wisdom of the toa (auto correct wanted to put toast :lol: )

Great listen and a huge eye opener for me personally, I've noticed so many horrible characteristics in my own personality, which seem to be natural in western society. I certainly couldn't see myself practicing Toaism but it gives some great insights into human behaviour from two very different cultures.
Thanks for sharing this. Managed to find the audiobook in full on YT and look forward to getting through it. (this one definitely goes in the "b4 bed" pile)

I think if you were to take up taoist philosophy you'd adopt the position that personalities cannot be "horrible"; instead they simply just are. Knowing they're a result of how things played out in the universe and accepting that. Sort of like if we rolled a dice twice we recognise the 6 is no different to the 1. The bitter old man is no different from the Saint. The universe is constantly in motion and as such accepting circumstances for what they are doesn't mean we're saying things will never change. They're changing all the time and if you want to work on certain parts of your personality I say more power to you. Once we understand the true nature of how things came to be, there's really no room for affliction to circumstance. Certainly not long-term anyway.
Thank you eightbo! This reply really will be digesting into my thoughts for some time. I don't want to spew a nonsense reply.
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Rosado
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Just started to read A Monk's Guide to A Clean House & Mind. Usually I don't like these kind of books but this has a lot of good tips.
carlevans
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Chaos Unleashed (Author: Barry Hoffman)
PeterLe
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Joined: Wed Apr 15, 2009 3:19 pm

I'm currently reading/listening to "The New Market Wizards"...and I Listened to the interview by William Eckhardt this morning. Although some of it went over my head, a lot of it resonated with me. (ill need to listen to it again!)
I think anyone who using automation will get something out of this. Recommended (Just for this one chapter if nothing else)
Regards
Peter
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jimibt
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i'm currently reading/listening (thank you kindle/audible for this synched up tech!!) to The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise of the East India Company. I had been *searching* for a good truthful book on the evils of the east india company for a LONG time. This one hits the nail on the head and is very accessible.

AVOID at all costs if you prefer the sugar coated version of history that you've learned about the EIC, this lays bare the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the bl00dy truth!!!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Anarchy-Rise-F ... 7010250454
PeterLe
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Just started reading "The man who solved the Market" about Jim Simons; really interesting and reads like a novel..
Only a couple of hours in, but id recommend this esp to those who run automated strategies etc
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Euler
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I'm also reading this at the moment.
sa7med
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PeterLe wrote:
Tue Dec 17, 2019 1:18 pm
Just started reading "The man who solved the Market" about Jim Simons; really interesting and reads like a novel..
Only a couple of hours in, but id recommend this esp to those who run automated strategies etc
Just looked him up, that's one hell of an edge! Thanks for the suggestion. Will definitely give it a read.
PeterLe
Posts: 3596
Joined: Wed Apr 15, 2009 3:19 pm

I thought Id post this whilst i remember :D
Ive been following what happened to Navinder Sarao who was considered (rightly or wrongly) to have caused the flash crash of 2010. It recen;t went to court in the US and he escaped a lengthy jail sentence.
he was a self taught trader who amassed around £90m and earned upto £90K a day from his mum and dads back bedroom! :o
He had a program written for him that essentially submitted many spoof bets (mhmm that sound familiar ;)

Well there is a book due out in written and audiobook next month

Flash Crash: A Trading Savant, a Global Manhunt and the Most Mysterious Market Crash in History

Def one for the list and looking forward to reading it (oh and there is a film too soon, although with The big Short being the exception; these tend not to lend themselves too well to the big screen imo)


Summary

At 14.32 p.m. on May 6, 2010, stock markets around the world simultaneously crashed without warning, wiping out trillions of dollars and creating havoc. The incident, dubbed 'The Flash Crash', exposed the shaky foundations propping up today's hyper-fast, computer-dominated financial system.

Government hearings, academic papers and a sweeping US investigation followed but, for years, its cause remained a mystery. Then, on April 21, 2015, two dozen police officers and FBI agents descended on a shabby suburban street in Hounslow to arrest an unlikely figure: Navinder Singh Sarao, a slight, doe-eyed 36-year old second-generation British Indian who - despite never having set foot in an investment bank - had earned more than $60 million trading futures in the same bedroom he'd slept in since he was a boy.

Sarao was a genuine savant, a one-in-a-million talent for whom making money in the markets was just another computer game to perfect. But he also had a steely, stubborn side. In 2009, frustrated by what he and many others saw as the unfair advantage enjoyed by multibillion-dollar high-frequency trading firms, Sarao had built a computer system that ‘spoofed’ his rivals into trading how he wanted.

He called it ‘NavTrader’, and the US government says it contributed to the biggest crash in the history of financial markets. The Flash Crash tells the unlikely story of how a streetwise, working-class outsider from West London who lived with his parents and never had a job came to outsmart some of the richest and most sophisticated investors in the world, raking in millions of pounds until the fateful day his doomsday machine worked too well, and he stood accused of bringing the global financial system to the brink of collapse.
©2019 Liam Vaughan (P)2019 HarperCollins Publishers Limited
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